Category

Cancer Diagnosis and Innovations

Photo of volunteers standing out side a shop front holding a cheque

Charity shop raises £20k for cancer equipment

By | Cancer Diagnosis and Innovations

A charity shop in Cleethorpes has raised £20,000, which will benefit bowel cancer patients at Grimsby hospital.

Sea View Cancer Charity Shop has been drumming up funds for the Health Tree Foundation (HTF) – the hospital’s official charity – for the last four years.

Photo of volunteers standing out side a shop front holding a cheque

Volunteers at the Sea View Cancer Charity Shop in Cleethorpes

The money has been raised through donations customers have made and sales made through the store. It will be put towards specialist equipment, which will help bowel cancer patients who need treatment during a very difficult time.

Prue Stillings, 72, one of the volunteers, who has worked at the store since it opened in the late 1970s, said: “It is fantastic that the money we have raised will go towards helping cancer patients at the hospital. I have had cancer myself three times so I wanted to give something back to people who have been through what I have.

“All of the ladies that work in the shop are volunteers and one of them is 94! We did struggle during the pandemic as we couldn’t open but things have got better recently. We received a grant from the council which really helped us. We are hoping to continue to raise more money for the charity in the future.”

The shop has previously raised more than £20,000 for HTF’s Rear into Gear appeal, which went towards new state-of-the-art equipment for the Colorectal Team at Grimsby and Scunthorpe hospitals.

Miss Stillings, who has previously been invited to Buckingham Palace to meet the Queen thanks to her fundraising efforts, added: “We started raising money after I lost my father and brother in the same week to cancer. We used to be based on St Peter’s Avenue but eventually moved to Sea View Street. We have raised more than £1 million over the years for various cancer causes.”

Lucy Skipworth, Grimsby Community Champion for HTF, said: “I am delighted that the Sea View Cancer Charity Shop has raised this incredible amount of money for us. It will really help our patients who use our cancer services.”

3,000 people could benefit from ‘life saving checks’ as NHS lung health check service moves to Tesco Superstore in Orchard Park

By | Awareness and Early Diagnosis, Cancer Diagnosis and Innovations | No Comments

3,000 people could benefit from ‘life saving checks’ as NHS lung health check service moves to Tesco Superstore in Orchard Park

A high-tech mobile screening unit, which is helping to save lives through earlier diagnosis of lung cancer and other conditions, has just arrived at Tesco Superstore on Hall Road in Orchard Park.

The relocation of the NHS lung health check unit marks the start of approximately 3,000 more people being invited to attend the service, which offers those at increased risk of lung cancer an MOT for their lungs.

The NHS lung health check service originally launched in west Hull in January 2020 and has since delivered over 8,700 assessments, helped to diagnose cancer and other respiratory diseases at an early stage, and provided opportunities for earlier treatment that has saved people’s lives.

Current and former smokers who live in Hull, are aged from 55 to 74 and are registered with a GP in the north Hull area, will receive a lung health check invitation from their GP over the next few weeks.

The lung health check takes place in two stages. The first is an initial phone assessment with a specially trained respiratory nurse.

Christine (left) and Danny (right) sat on a bench outdoors.

Danny (right) received curative treatment after his lung health check helped to identify lung cancer early.

If the assessment finds the person to be at high risk, they will be offered a low dose CT scan of the lungs for further investigation.

The CT scanner is housed on board a high-tech mobile screening unit that has previously been located at North Point Shopping Centre in north Hull and Lidl in west Hull. As the service moves around the city, participants who wish to stop smoking are also offered expert support and advice.

Dr Masood Balouch, a local GP and NHS Hull Clinical Commissioning Group Board member, said: “Having supported many patients with advanced lung cancer, I know how vitally important it is to book your lung health check appointment when invited, even if you feel fine.

“Lung cancer is commonly diagnosed at a late stage as there often no symptoms in the earliest stages, but lung health checks are helping us to spot cancer earlier, often before symptoms occur.

“If you are registered with a GP practice in north Hull and receive a lung health check invite, don’t ignore it – book your appointment straight away. If you are experiencing symptoms of lung cancer, contact your GP straight away and do not wait for a lung health check.”

Dr Gavin Anderson, Responsible Clinician for NHS Targeted Lung Health Checks in Hull, said: “Following an initial telephone assessment with a specialised respiratory nurse, eligible participants may be invited to attend a follow-up CT scan on board the mobile unit.

“There are lots of safety measures on board to reduce any risk of Covid-19 and the dedicated team are available to answer any questions you may have either before or after your appointment.

“Lung health check scan results are analysed by a specialist clinical ‘hub’ within the hospital and participants receive their results in approximately two weeks. If further follow up is needed, participants are referred by the service to their GP or hospital.”

Dr Stuart Baugh, Clinical Director at Humber and North Yorkshire Cancer Alliance, said: “People diagnosed with lung cancer at the earliest stage are nearly 20 times more likely to survive for five years than those whose cancer is caught late.

“The rollout of the NHS Targeted Lung Health Check Programme is a huge step towards achieving our NHS Long Term Plan ambition of catching more cancers at an earlier stage when they are easier to treat.

“The service has already received fantastic feedback from people who have taken part and we look forward to helping even more people as the service continues to move around the city. If you or a member of your family receive a lung health check invitation, don’t ignore it – book your appointment without delay.”

Find out more about lung health checks in Hull at www.lunghealthcheck.org.uk.

Image of CT scanner

New diagnostics capacity to boost access to care in Humber, Coast and Vale

By | Cancer Diagnosis and Innovations | No Comments

People living in Humber, Coast and Vale are set to benefit from earlier diagnostic tests, provided closer to home thanks to investment in new mobile MRI and CT scanning facilities.

The Humber, Coast and Vale Health and Care Partnership (Integrated Care System) has secured an £8.6million share of a £350million national pot, announced by the Government last week (1 October), that will support development of new models of Community Diagnostic Provision. This additional mobile capacity will contribute towards the national combined 2.8 million scans in their first full year of operation.

The HCV Partnership (ICS) is adopting an innovative and collaborative approach to developing and delivering diagnostic services, including the purchase of a mobile MRI and a mobile CT scanner to improve access and reduce waiting times for patients. Over time the mobile service will be deployed flexibly across the region with potential to deliver an additional 500 CT and 500 MRI scans per month.

Photo of Dr Wells stood in front of a brick wall wearing a black suit, white shit and blue tie. Dr Wells is looking at the camera, smiling.

The investment will help to reduce waiting times, improve patient experience and access to diagnostic services, and support the implementation of better pathways of care in key clinical areas including cancer, cardiac and respiratory care.

Dr Nigel Wells, a GP and HCV Partnership (ICS) Clinical Lead, said:

“Our local teams have already made great progress in ramping-up scans and tests back up to pre-pandemic levels. This new investment will help us go even further, whilst also providing a more convenient model of service delivery for patients.”

The increase in scanning capability will help to achieve:

  • earlier diagnoses for patients through easier, faster, and more direct access to the MRI and CT scans needed to understand patients’ symptoms and direct them to the right care as soon as possible
  • a reduction in hospital visits which will help to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission
  • a contribution to the NHS’ net zero ambitions by providing multiple tests at one visit, reducing the number of patient journeys and helping to cut carbon emissions and air pollution.

GPs will be able to refer patients to more locally based services so they can access life-saving checks closer to home and be diagnosed for a range of conditions, rather than travelling to hospital. This will be more convenient for patients, more efficient and more resilient to the risk of cancelled tests in hospitals due to Covid-19.

New Rapid Diagnostic Centre continues to assess patients during Covid-19 pandemic

By | Cancer Diagnosis and Innovations

A new service launched in January for patients with symptoms that are cause for concern but do not meet the criteria for urgent referral for cancer, has continued to assess patients despite the Covid-19 pandemic.

The new Rapid Diagnosis Centre (RDC) for suspected cancer is clinically led by James Turvill from Gastroenterology and James Haselden from Radiology.

James Turvill said: “When a patient goes to their GP with symptoms such as unexplained and unintentional weight loss, unexplained loss of appetite, fatigue, nausea, bloating or vague abdominal or unexpected or progressive pain, the GP often has a ‘gut feeling’ of a possible cancer diagnosis.

“Unfortunately, in the NHS system is there is no clear referral pathway for patients with serious non-specific but concerning symptoms unless patients have findings that meet the two week criteria for a site specific urgent referral pathway for cancer.

“The rapid diagnostic one stop clinic is an exciting breakthrough for the York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and fantastic news for patients who visit their GP with worrying symptoms.”

The early diagnosis initiative involves two Primary Care Networks consisting of 11 GP practices to test and refine the new pathway. Spencer Robinson, Improvement Lead for the rapid diagnosis centre, designed the new service.

Spencer said: “We are very proud to have developed this new cancer pathway from scratch and launched it on time.

“Unfortunately circumstances have changed and we have had to modify the service for a period of time in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. We are still accepting referrals but the ‘one stop approach’ is suspended due to limited access to endoscopy and CT scans.

“Patients are still being assessed and if they are emergency or a high risk are offered diagnostic tests followed by a video or telephone consultation with the RDC consultant regarding outcome and next steps.

A man photographed from the chest up, wearing a blue shirt, brown blazer, blue tie and black thick-framed glasses. He has some grey stubble and is standing in front of a brick wall that is slightly out of focus.

“Low risk patients are supported by the RDC Coordinator and RDC Advanced Nurse Practitioner via telephone with six weekly follow up telephone assessments to reassess their symptoms.”

The centre is supported by Cancer Care Coordinator, Laura Brett and Cancer Nurse Specialist Jo Clark.

Laura said: “The patients we have had through the pathway so far have found the one stop approach to be really valuable, even though it has been a long day for them. We are looking forward to being able to resume the full service. The most rewarding part of my role is getting to meet our patients and provide any support they need throughout the RDC pathway.”

Cancer Nurse Specialist Jo Clark has been working with patients with cancer for over ten years.

Jo said: “The RDC pathway is personalised, reduces unnecessary appointments and tests and improves delays in diagnosis. I have seen the effects that waiting for tests and results can have on patients so improving this part of the patients journey is such a positive step. Even though we are limited  by the current circumstances, we discuss and review the patient’s pathway frequently to make sure we are supporting  them the best way we can through this difficult journey.”

Mikki Golodnitski, Programme Lead for Diagnostics at Humber, Coast and Vale Cancer Alliance (HCV CA) has supported the development of RDCs at York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and said:

“Over the last 12 months, the HCV CA Diagnostic team have worked in collaboration with York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust to pilot a full RDC Pathway for patients with serious non-specific symptoms within Humber, Coast and Vale region.

“RDC pathways support the Alliance’s overarching ambition of achieving faster diagnosis for patients and we are delighted that the York RDC team have managed to effectively adapt their services in order to maintain its benefits to patients during the coronavirus pandemic.

“The Alliance continues to work with stakeholders in each locality to build on work that has already commenced to embed the RDC principles and pathways across the Humber, Coast and Vale region.”

To find out how Cancer Alliances are driving force for change, providing dedicated focus and capacity to deliver improvements in cancer outcomes locally, please click here.

An image of Dan Cottingham, Cancer and End of Life Lead at NHS Vale of York

70% drop in Vale of York Cancer referrals as doctors urge people to visit their GP

By | Awareness and Early Diagnosis, Cancer Diagnosis and Innovations | No Comments

NHS Vale of York Clinical Commissioning Group, York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and GP Practices from the Humber, Coast and Vale Cancer Alliance are working together to ensure cancer services continue safely, urging people not to delay seeking help if they notice any signs and symptoms of cancer.

Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, across the Vale of York, there has been a 70% reduction in two-week referrals from GP practices to secondary care. A statistic which is extremely worrying to health professionals as they witness fewer patients making appointments to express their health concerns.

Dr Dan Cottingham, Cancer and End of Life Lead at NHS Vale of York Clinical Commissioning Group said:

Cancer hasn’t gone away because of coronavirus. There will still be people in our community experiencing signs and symptoms of cancer such as the sudden appearance of a lump, blood in their urine, or a change to usual bowel habits - and so it is vital these people contact their GP practice so a doctor can investigate and refer to a specialist if necessary.

GP appointments are still available for patients to talk through any concerns over the phone or via an online video consultation, and are working closely with cancer specialist teams at York and Scarborough hospitals to ensure urgent cases continue to be seen promptly.”

Accessing a GP has changed during the pandemic but GP practices are continuing to provide the same safe care they always have done.

People who are referred into York hospital for treatment or who are already on a course of treatment can expect the same quality of care, the way that care now looks however may have changed due to the restrictions of the pandemic.  York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust has redesigned services to enable the safe continuation of quality care during the pandemic.

Laura Milburn, Head of Cancer at York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, said:

It is vital that patients experiencing concerning symptoms, especially those that could be cancer, contact their GPs for assessment during the pandemic.

GP and hospital services have had to change significantly to manage the impact of the pandemic but we want to reassure patients who are referred into our hospitals for investigation that we are still providing the same quality of care, just in a different way, ensuring all the appropriate measures in line with government guidance are in place to keep patients safe when accessing services.”

To support with cancer referrals and ongoing cancer services in the Vale of York area, the Humber, Coast and Vale (HCV) Cancer Alliance has accelerated the procurement of home working stations within our region to report from home during Covid-19.

Dr Oliver Byass, Clinical Director for Radiology, Humber, Coast and Vale Cancer Alliance said:

The collaborative reporting solution sits above our independent picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and work stations within our hospitals and will allow us, as individual radiologists, to report the ‘right test first time’ seamlessly across our organisations and this is going to be transformational as to how we work in the future.

Our work in modern radiology is a lot about diagnostics and trying to get the patient diagnosis both safely and as quickly as possible and we are very fortunate that modern radiology, CT, MRI and ultrasound have amazing diagnostic capabilities.”

For more information on seeking help during Covid-19, read our blog on what to do about possible cancer symptoms.

Helping to support the continuation of cancer diagnosis during Covid-19

By | Cancer Diagnosis and Innovations

Humber, Coast and Vale Cancer Alliance has accelerated the procurement of home working stations to enable the reporting workforce within our region to report from home during Covid-19.

Thirty home working stations, which have been funded through transformational monies, will be placed in reporters homes across Humber, Coast and Vale region to help alleviate any pressures caused by staff needing to self-isolate or reduce travel into acute sites.

The Cancer Alliance has worked with Northern Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Foundation Trust, York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and Hull University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust to agree where these stations are placed for maximum impact.

As well as supporting the continuation of cancer diagnosis in line with national guidance during covid-19, the home working stations will also support service delivery in the immediate post Covid-19 period and will enable collaborative working and increased capacity for reporting in the longer term.

As the Alliance move forwards, the work stations will form part of the Humber, Coast and Vale collaborative reporting solution, described below by Dr Oliver Byass, Clinical Director for Radiology at Hull University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust:

“The collaborative reporting solution sits above our independent Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and work stations within the various trusts and will allow us as individual radiologists to report the ‘right test first time’ seamlessly across our organisations and that is going to be transformational as to how we work in the future.

Our work in modern radiology is a lot about diagnostics and trying to get the patient diagnosis both safely and as quickly as soon as possible and we are very fortunate in the fact that modern radiology, CT, MRI and ultrasound have amazing diagnostic capabilities”

This work will help support the Alliance ambition of earlier diagnosis and better outcomes for patients, whilst delivering sustainable diagnostic services across the area.

X
Skip to content